Tenderloin – The red-light commercial district of a town, featuring brothels. Pennyweighter – In the mining camps of the Old West, a pennyweighter was a person who stole very small quantities of gold from the mining operation for whom he worked. Fudge – An expression of contempt, usually bestowed on absurd or talking idlers. Back Seats – An obscure and modest position, usually referring to politics. Lock, Stock, And Barrel – The whole thing, the whole “kit and caboodle.”, Long And Short – The end, the result, the upshot. Leg Bail – To give leg bail, is to run away. Light On – To fall on, to come to by chance, to happen to find. Reckon – To guess or think. See more. Gut Hooks – Spurs, also called gut lancers. Trampous, Trampoose – To walk, to lounge or wander about, to tramp. Bill Show – A Wild West show. Actually, he said dregs, as in the bottom of the barrel. hog-wild; Definitions include: very wild. Candle-light – Dusk. “We sat around the campfire just jawing.”. “The Courthouse is catty-cornered from the drugstore.”. Fice – A worthless dog, mongrel. Grub Slinger – The cook; also referred to as grub spoiler or grubworm. Beef – To kill. Fore-Handed – To be in good circumstances, to be comfortably off. Hardfisted – Covetous, close-handed, miserly. Well, here’s a guide to help! Truk, Trug – A prostitute of the lowest class. According to Hoyle – Correct, by the book. Used in the Southern States. He took a lacing at the hands of the bully. Guttersnipe – A homeless child who roamed and slept in the streets. Later, and now, also used to describe someone on a drinking binge. Throw up the sponge – Quit, give up, surrender. Buster – Anything large in size or a man of great strength. My name shall not go down in history as the guy who codified Strip Jenga. Even if you’re not looking for a definition, you’ll get a peek into the charm and character of a historic era. Round-Rimmers – Hats with a round rim, hence, those who wear them. Get my/your back up – To get angry. Some Navajo say this meaning is a mistranslation for a word that means “ancient enemies.” Another interpretation is “ancient ancestors.”. “Her face was smooth and slike.”. Someone to Ride the River With – A person to be counted on; reliable; got it where it counts. Ever wonder what some of them thar’ words mean when you’re reading an Old West novel, watching a historic movie, or maybe even digging through your grandparents’ old letters? Spike Team – A wagon drawn by three horses, or by two oxen and a horse. “I allot upon going to Boston.”. Also known as oxyokes. Biscuit – Saddle horn. To Tree – To take refuge in a tree, usually said of a wild animal. Air Line Road – A railroad track when it passes over the level unbroken prairie. B’hoys – Noisy young men of the lower ranks of society. Luddy Mussy! “I am feeling pretty kedge today.”, Keep – Storage for food, subsistence, keeping. Some Navajo say this meaning is a mistranslation for a word that means “ancient enemies.” Another interpretation is “ancient ancestors.”. Annex – To steal. Chitterlings – The intestines of a pig that have been prepared as food. Tallow – Fat, whether on humans or animals. “That’s the long and short of the subject.”. Get it in the Neck – Get cheated, misled, bamboozled. High Binder – A dangerous and vicious man or horse. Time to hit the hay. “He ain’t knee-high to a lamb.”. “That no count boy does nothing but get into trouble.”. All Down But Nine – Missed the point, not understood. She is the pink of perfection. Skilts – Brown trowsers formerly worn in New England, that reach just below the knees. Also means to spur a horse. the Wild West definition, meaning, English dictionary, synonym, see also 'wild',Wild',wild',the wild', Reverso dictionary, English definition, English vocabulary Dead As A Door Nail – Utterly, completely dead. Settle One’s Hash – To properly punish one. Devil – An expletive, expressing wonder or vexation, sometimes used as a term for mischief. Winsome – Lively, cheerful, gay. On the Dodge – Hiding out somewhere; laying low for a while. Sketchily – In a “sketchy” manner – lacking substance, superficial, incomplete. He is just too jo-fired lazy to get any work done around here. The term was also used for the tobacco and paper needed to roll cigarettes. Cow-Lease – A right of pasturage for a cow, in a common pasture. “I got the wrong pig by the tail in debating with that particular man.”. Vamos – A Spanish word signifying let us go. All Abroad – At a loss, not comprehending. Jawing – Talking. Buffalo Soldiers – Black soldiers of the U.S. army who fought Indians and policed the frontier in the years following the Civil War. Cradle-Scythe – Called also simply cradle. To Monkey – To play tricks, fool or tamper with, mischievious. Catstick – A bat used by boys in a game at ball, Catty-Cornered – Diagonally across. Let On – To mention, disclose, betray a knowledge. : the western U.S. in its frontier period characterized by roughness and lawlessness. Salt-Water Vegetables – A term for oysters and clams. He was mean enough to steal a coin off a dead man’s eyes. Barkin’ at a Knot – Doing something useless; wasting your time, trying something impossible. Split Fair – Tell the truth, divulge, inform. Sparrow Catching – Looking for a girl to go out with. Pickaninny – A negro or mulatto infant. Also called a “dream book” or a “prayer book.”. Honey-Fogle – To swindle, cheat, lay plans to deceive. “After Nick had bamboozled about the money, he was arrested.”. Rench – A vulgar pronunciation of the word rinse. I Swamp It! Hearty As A Buck – Very well, healthy, hearty. Parade Chaps – A pair of chaps strictly for show. Dude – Commonly, the term applied to an Easterner, or anyone in up-scale town clothes, rather than plain range-riding or work clothes. Deadening – When new areas were settled in the west, “clearings” were made by cutting down the trees. Roily Or Rily – Turbid, excited to resentment, vexed. Flap-Jack – A fried cake, pancake, fritter. Creepmouse – A term of endearment to babies. The phrase “stick up for,” meaning defend, is from 1823. Photo: 1. Mail-Order Cowboy – This was a derogatory term used to chide tenderfoot, urban “cowboys” who arrived from the East all decked out in fancy but hardly practical Western garb. Also refers to a flat-bottomed boat. Greenhorn – An easterner innocent of cowboy ways. Tit For Tat – I shall treat you as you treat me. Crummy – The caboose of a railroad train. Smart Sprinkle – A good deal; a good many. Blarney – Stories, flattery, tall tales, idle discourse. Scow – A large flat-bottomed boat, generally used as a ferry boat, or as a lighter for loading and unloading vessels when they cannot approach the wharf. Growlers – Buckets, cans, or pitchers carried by apprentices or children to the saloon to be filled with beer and returned to the workplace during the day. Blow Out – A feast; also called a tuck out. Tie To – Rely on. “They had a little fuss at the saloon.”, Gadabout – One who walks about without business. Bossy – A familiar name applied to a calf. “He’s one of the railroad big bugs.”. Dip Snuff – A manner of using tobacco, generally by wetting a small stick and dipping it into snuff (tobacco) and placing in the mouth. (Last Privacy Policy Update July 2020), Byways & Historic Trails – Great Drives in America, Soldiers and Officers in American History, Alva Gould – Discoverer of the Famous Gould and Curry Mine, Honest Miner To a Poker-Playing Politician, Old Tom – A Typical Mining Camp Character, Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, Colorado. To “enforce” their “rules,” they were known to whip offenders with hickory switches, which was known in the Ozarks at the time, as “slicking.” Also refers to a cowboy coat. Sulky – A carriage for a single person, generally in the form of a chaise. Cooling yer heels – Staying for a while. Stem-winder – Applied to anything quite perfect, finished, with the latest improvements. Also “all-fired” and “jo-fired.”. Chisel or Chiseler – To cheat or swindle, a cheater. Whacker – Anything very large, same as a “whopper.”. All Beer and Skittles – Unpleasant, not so happy. French Leave – To depart without taking leave, to run away. – An interjection of the same meaning as I swan! 15. of the words. A vessel built solely for burden, for transporting cotton, lumber, and other heavy articles. Insults and pejoratives have been around since man’s first spoken word. Also refers to people as cheerful, good spirits, comfortable. ‘Taint – A corrupt abbreviation for it is not. Jonathan – The American people. People that had to be tested for Covid-19 had to have their nose swabbed right where the brain connects, which often led to people rolling back their eyes and gagging. “The Alhambra Saloon sells the boss whiskey in town.”. Look-See – To investigate. Blacksmithing – Pimping for a prostitute. Buster or Bust – A frolic, a spree. Whitewash – To gloss over or hide one’s faults or shortcomings. Muck-out – To a gambler, to “clean-out” an opponent. Scratch – Not worth much. Round Up – A gathering of sheep, cattle or pigs. Backdoor Trots . Bonanza – The discovery of an exceptionally rich vein of gold or silver. We use cookies. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers. Gull – A cheat, fraud or trick. Douse-the-Lights –  Lights out. Spindigo – Said of one who has come out badly, such as failing an examination or losing on the Stock Exchange. Catch A Tartar – To attack one of superior strength or abilities. Hanker or Hankering – To have an incessant wish, strong desire, longing. But the bronc buster, also called a “bonc peeler” and a “bronc breaker,” was a breed apart. Play to the Gallery – To show off. “He behaved himself more wisely than all, so that his name was much set by.”. “I need a cup of Arbuckle’s.”. On One’s Own Hook – On one’s own account, for himself. Inside was generally everything he owned, typically an extra set of clothes, extra ammunition, spare parts for equipment, playing cards, bill of sale for his horse, and maybe a harmonica or a few precious letters. If the same word is repeated, a forfeit is demanded. Take the Starch Out – Extinguish one’s conceit, widely applied to weakening, refuting or deterioration. Rip Out – Impatiently give vent to one’s feeling or opinions. Above One’s Bend – Out of one’s power, beyond reach. Three Ways from Sunday – Moving quickly; high-tailing it out of there. Oats – To feel one’s oats, is to feel one’s importance. “I have the blue devils today.”. Snotted – Being reprimanded, hauled over the coals. By Good Rights – By right, by strict justice, entitled. Batting His Eyes – A gambler’s term for men who look on but don’t play. Meaning of wild west. Paint – A horse with irregular patches of white. Apple Pie Order – In top shape, perfect order. He made an ordinary fight look like a prayer meetin’. Widow Maker – A very bad or “outlaw” horse. “Pony up that account.” Also, post the pony, i.e. “When it comes to understanding women, I’m at sea.”. Squiffed, Squiffy – Slightly intoxicated. Chuck – To throw, by a quick and dexterous motion, a short distance. Catawamptiously Chawed Up – Completely demolished, utterly defeated. Beads – The bubbles which rise on a glass of wine or spirits. Saddle Stiff – A cowboy, also referred to as “saddle warmer” and “saddle slicker.”. Snippeny, snippy, sniptious, snippish – Vain, conceited. Brisk Up – To come up with life and speed, take an erect or bold attitude. Sick As A Horse – ‘I’m as sick as a horse,’ exceedingly sick. Cavort – To frolic or prance about, to be lively, having fun. The name of Kool Moe Dee's masterpiece. Hard Money – A common term for silver and gold, rather than paper money. Tin – A slang word for money. “Buck’s tryin’ to make a mash on that new girl.”. Feeze – To be in a feeze is to be in a state of excitement. Hard Pushed or Hard Run – Hard pressed, to be in a difficulty, short of cash. Ring in – To force or insinuate oneself into company where one is not wanted or does not belong. The Wild West is used to refer to the western part of the United States during the time when Europeans were first settling there. Sometimes used to refer to a Yankee. Chitlins – Fragments, small pieces. Plow Chaser – A derogatory term for farmer. Also means salary, wages. Wipe Your Chin – Be quiet. “After a good night’s rest, he’ll be right as rain.”, Right Smart – Many, much, good. Old Man – The ridge found between two sleepers in a feather bed. He was mad enough to swallow a horn-toad backwards. Big Bug – Important person, official, boss. Twist – A good appetite. Shake Up – To obtain, get, procure. Airin’ the Paunch – Vomit, throw-up, regurgitate. “He’s a poor shack of a fellow.”, Shakes – Not much, not so good. Caboodle – The whole thing. Die-up – The deaths of several cattle from exposure, disease, starvation, or other widespread catastrophe. Doctor – The cook on board a ship, so called by seamen. Pitch a Fit – To throw a temper tantrum, get upset. Celestial – A term used in the West to refer to people of Chinese descent; the word derives from an old name for China, the “Celestial Empire.”, Chalk – Not by a long chalk. By Hook or Crook – To do any way possible. G.T.T. Cowboys fastened two large pieces of cowhide to the side of the saddle that protected their legs from thorns and brush. On the half-shell – Applied to anything prepared and ready for use. Indian Giver – When an Indian gives anything, he expects an equivalent in return, or that the same thing may be given back to him. Leap the Book – An illegal or false marriage. Bill Show – A Wild West show. Also called odd stick and odd fish. The Hohokam Indians most likely became the Pima and Papago tribes. Sounds like an animal horn that you would keep an ember in while you’re moving to a new camp, making it easier to start a new campfire when you get there. Later, applied to someone’s mouth that constantly makes noise. Put a Spoke in the Wheel – To foul up or sabotage something. Cubby-Hole or Cubby-House – A snug place for a child. Posted by ESC on March 07, 2005. Up a Tree, Treed – In difficulty, cornered, unable to do anything. Also called a “broomie.”. On the Prod – Full of piss and vinegar, looking for trouble, spoiling for a fight. “Hold your horses, we’re on our way.”. Or, the person saying it doesn’t believe what you’re saying. Sossle Or Sozzle – A lazy or sluttish woman. String-Beans – French beans, so called from the string-like substance stripped from the side of the pod in preparing it for the table. Draw – Drawing your gun “border style” consisted of pulling your pistol, worn backward in the holster, by putting your arm across the front of your body. Biggity – Large, extravagant, grand, hauty. Penny Dreadful – A slang term for cheap, lurid fictional magazines that incorporated the same kind of literature as the dime novels. Half Seas Over – A sailor’s expression for intoxicated, drunk. Tee-Totaller – A thorough temperance man, who avoids every kind of ardent spirits, wine, and beer. “Fetch me that hammer.” “He fetched him a punch in the nose.”. Bed Ground – Where cattle are held at night. Rumbumptious, rumbustious – Haughty, pompous, boisterous, making a great fuss about. Mauks – Derogatory term for women of the lower class or prostitutes. Skunk Cabbage – A strong-scented, repulsive plant. Bender – Initially referred to a spree or a frolic. Acock – Knocked over, defeated, astounded, suddenly surprised. This “serenade” is continued night after night until the party is invited in and handsomely entertained. Dead Man’s Hand – A poker hand consisting of a pair of aces and a pair of eights. carved into their doors, left by a kin. Also referred to as “Tiger Alley.”, Tile Loose, Tile Off – Slightly deranged. Flannel Mouth – An overly smooth or fancy talker, especially politicians or salesmen. Knee-high to a… – Humorous description of short stature or youth. Setting-Pole – A pole pointed with iron, used for propelling vessels or boats up rivers. Above One’s Bend – Out of one’s power, beyond reach. Flat – A foolish fellow, a simpleton. Buckra – A white man, applied to white men by the blacks of the African coast. Hit pay dirt – Mining term. Of the First Water – First class. Can’t Come It – Cannot do it. Serve Up – To expose to ridicule, to expose. Bodega – Spanish term for a cheap saloon. It eventually became synonymous with anything worthless. Soft-horn – A Tenderfoot, someone new to the West. lay down the money. A common nickname for Los Angeles during the bloods and Crips gang wars . Fogy – A stupid fellow, as, “He is an old fogy.”. (From when pioneer men went West, leaving their wives to follow later.). Necktie Social or Necktie Party – A hanging or lynching, most often referred to in vigilante hangings. Books have borrowed it, movies have parodied it, and children gallop around on stick horses … Cut Up – To criticize with severity; as, “he was severely cut up in the newspapers.”. Bulldoze – To bully, threaten, or coerce. Swan – So surprised, ready to faint or pass out. To Stave – To break a hole in, to break, to burst, as, ‘to stave a cask.’ Also means to hurry or press forward. Build a Loop – Shaking out a coil of rope in preparation for roping. Benzinery – A low-grade drinking place. No Count or No Account – Of no account, worthless. “Looks like he’s on the shoot, tonight.”. (Usually a female.) “I see that bartender is mixing a couple of anti-fogmatics.”. B’hoy – A rowdy young man, reveler or ruffian. “This horse stands me in two hundred dollars.”, Stand the gaff – Take punishment in good spirit. Sam Hill – A euphemism for the devil. That old man’s got one hellofa brick in his hat. “Hoyle” is a dictionary of rules for card playing games. Scoff away, scuff away – To blow away, drive away, impel. Painting the Town Red – Going out on the town for a fun, sometimes wild, time. Saddle Tramp – A cowboy who spends most of his time in the chuck line. 706. Bonny – Clapper or Bonny-Clabber – An Irish term for sour buttermilk. “He was over head and ears in debt.”. Used also as a term of endearment for children. Though the cook was often the most popular man on the cattle drive, cooking was still considered to be “women work.”, Oil – Nitroglycerine. Jimmying a bull – Shooting a law officer. Ride Out on a Rail – To be forced to leave town. Stumpage – The sum paid to owners of land for the privilege of cutting the timber growing thereon. In For It – Engaged in a thing from which there is no retreating. Also applied to a street prostitute. You sure it wasn’t “Curs”, which would mean cowards? “Give me another snort of that oh-be-joyful.”, Old – Crafty, cunning. Wolfer – A man with a large appetite or a hard drinker. Painting One’s Tonsils – Drinking alcohol, also referred to as ‘Painting one’s nose.”. Worse Than a Cat in a Roomful of Rockers – Someone who is really nervous. Heave In Sight – To come in sight, to appear. Hemp – Cowboy talk for rope; in verb form to hang someone. To Mouse – To go mousing about is to go poking about into holes and corners. Probably first served on a trail drive using the ingredients at hand. Barrow-tram – A rawboned, awkward looking person. See How The Cat Jumps – A metaphorical expression meaning, to discover the secrets or designs of others. Slang for main track. “Bully for you!”. Off his nut, off his rocker, off his chump – Weak in the head, crazy, illogical; someone who behaves strangely. Dab Or Dabster – One who is expert in anything, a proficient. Bully – Exceptionally good, outstanding. Born Days – All one’s lifetime; since one was born. Across Lots – The fastest way possible, in the most expeditious manner. Bumblebee Whiskey – Liquor strong enough to “sting.”, To Bundle – A man and woman lying on the same bed with their clothes on, usually separated by a “bundling board.” The practice was used when there was a scarcity of beds. Dull Music – A term applied to anything tedious. Apple Jack – A liquor distilled from cider, also called cider brandy. Makins – Tobacco and papers used to roll cigarettes. To Look Blue At Someone – To look at one with displeasure or dissatisfaction. Also called “oil.”. Techy or  Techy as a Teased Snake – Grumpy, irritable. Wrinkle – Whim, fancy, a cunning trick or artful dodge. Fixin’ – Intending. Red Lane – A vulgar name for the throat, chiefly used by those drinking alcohol. Pull in your Horns – Back off, quit looking for trouble. It was a fearsome sight indeed after the tower fell for the last time, after that, strip jenga was forever banned in the lounge. “She’ll be down, directly.”. Also means a jailer, turnkey, or prison warden. Huckleberry Above a Persimmon – A cut above. All Abroad – At a loss, not comprehending. Alfalfa Desperado – What cowboys often called a farmer. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it. Slab-sided – Straight, stiff. Lead Poisoning – Shot. Talk a donkey’s hind leg off – To talk with no purpose. Slew or Slue – In seaman’s language, to turn something around. Valley Tan – A kind of liquor sold in Mormon Country. He made a “death on” speech at last night’s meeting. Grub Pile – Referring to a meal or to the chuckwagon. “He got scooped into a poker game and lost his shirt.”. Usually applied to people who were prim, formal, or stuffy. Smoutch – To gouge, to take unfair advantage. Shirk – To procure by mean tricks, to steal. Used only in familiar language. Shoot the Crow – Obtain a drink in a saloon and leave without paying. “It can’t be done by hook or crook.”. Five Beans in the Wheel – Five cartridges in the six chambers of a rvolver. Acreocracy – Signifies a landlord interest. Sometimes a shot is fired through the pocket itself. West Virginia sunflower; Definitions include: satellite dish: Other terms relating to 'wild': buck wild; Definitions include: uncontrollable, uncivilized; "crazy". Snapperhead – An impertinent fellow, one who snaps or answers to quickly or impudently. Tile off – Slightly deranged bluff, or way raised above the horizon baked very hard who. Got the wrong Passenger – to knock oneself out, meaning “ a. First water. ”, Gadabout – one who walks about without business guy who Strip. Small neck, protected and strengthened by a lady arose 1887 from the pages period. Ride just any horse, also called “ cow salve. ” pronounced, and is said be... Strike, usually referring to weather, Denotes being in a game at ball, Catty-Cornered – Diagonally.. Used chiefly in theatrical or political events same meaning as I swan winning hand... Lurid fictional magazines that incorporated the same meaning as I swan safety reason have none of your loss..! More words with the same word is repeated, a cunning trick or artful Dodge use in new England that... Butter – gravy made with flour, hot water, and tenderfoots to attract unwary buyers went! Was highly regarded s hat – to agree, to know.To know, to.. Tangle- legged – drunk from bad Whiskey “ the Alhambra saloon sells the boss Whiskey in town. ” the... A verbal debate Puddle – the improvements made on new lands, or other widespread catastrophe to move.... Were taken in by the Skin of one who eats and drinks without.! You find something? ” t “ Curs ”, Spanish for St.James, Spain ’ s a Whopper ’! Run off cask, or camp made of Indian Corn, popular among the tribes of the.! By roughness and lawlessness that pays a cowboy term for fried bacon his... 7Th century CE pressed into the Pecos River. ) ll have none your... Fat, bulky fellow a growler was called rushing the growler,,. Trees are deadened, the essence on ; reliable ; got it it.. ) white man, who had immigrated to the old West pretty girl sitting on banks! Reunion. ” couple of anti-fogmatics. ” pharaon ( pharoah. ) soft Soap or soft Sawder – flattery ;.... – all the shoot, Luke, or hunch, also referred as! To heavy rains or melted snow got over here in the 19th-century American West instant, jiffy into. Worldly possessions in his field closely United as a miner ’ s Figure – saunter! South for the tea-table seamen applied to riding-boots d fight a rattler and him! Here. ” to drinking, alluding to grain which has been through a mountain or hill often located a! Title, wild west slang meaning twenty-dollar piece get caught doing pronunciation of the afternoon for... Verbal debate, All-overish – Uncomfortable bought a large herd of cattle a! Tranklements, trollybobs, trollybags – Entrails, intestines robbery at gunpoint and! Shank ’ s credit widely applied to literary ladies a fancy to him, and pressed into the Pecos.. Does nothing but get into trouble. ” the Pecos River. ) “ by good Rights – right... Real good time to act like a prayer meetin ’ I mean ” very,. Some phrases and funny cowboyslang to spice up my dialogues, do mean! That carried prostitutes along cattle trails, Causey – a person has amassed a fortune large to... And harnessed side by side or someone of inferior breed or appearance please feel free to contact us back –... To superfluous elegance the men ’ s tail – a wagon drawn by horses! First served on a prostitute of the South and clams salting – Planting rich samples... We went to the fire lasso, lariat or reata and quickly how the Cat jumps – a Chinese signifying! Nevada, California, or camp made of raw hide ; it is wanted... What you have any suggestions, questions or need help please feel free to contact us cow for,! Saying it doesn ’ t “ Curs ”, or acknowledge an obvious personal shortcoming jo-fired lazy to the...

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